Oman
Maldives
India
Indonesia
Oman
AIIB-Amundi
Water from Air
China
Viet Nam
Georgia

OUR INVESTMENTS

Share a section of the page
SHARE
2020 AIIB Annual Report and Financials
DOWNLOAD REPORT
DOWNLOAD FINANCIALS

Our Investments Data

2020 crippled the global economy. Yet, instead of retreating, we moved forward, investing more than ever before in our five-year history.

In 2020 we invested USD9.98 billion in our clients and members, more than twice what we invested in 2019 and almost six times more than during our first year of operations, because our financial support was critical to helping them navigate the pandemic’s impacts. We approved 45 projects in 2020, more than one-and-a-half times the number we approved in 2019 and more than five times what we approved in our first year of operations.

US Dollar Investments
  • YEAR
  • ANNUAL APPROVALS*
  • DISBURSED**
  • TOTAL (as of Dec. 31, 2020)
  • USD22.02 billion
  • USD9.13 billion
  • 2020
  • USD9.98 billion Investements

    % Change

    2019 124%
    2018 202%
    2017 299%
    2016 491%
  • USD6.23 billion Disbursed**

    % Change

    2019 321%
    2018 905%
    2017 689%
    2016 62200%
  • 2019
  • USD4.54 billion Investements

    % Change

    2018 37%
    2017 82%
    2016 169%
  • USD1.48 billion Disbursed**

    % Change

    2018 139%
    2017 87%
    2016 14700%
  • 2018
  • USD3.31 billion Investements

    % Change

    2017 32%
    2016 96%
  • USD0.62 billion Disbursed**

    % Change

    2017 27%
    2016 6100%
  • 2017
  • USD2.50 billion Investements

    % Change

    2016 48%
  • USD0.79 billion Disbursed**

    % Change

    2016 7800%
  • 2016
  • USD1.69 billion
  • USD0.01 billion
* Maximum amount approved.
** Amount of cash disbursement and capitalized charges.
Click to generate chart
Approved Projects
  • YEAR
  • ANNUAL APPROVALS
  • TOTAL (as of Dec. 31, 2020)
  • 108
  • 2020
  • 45 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2019 61%
    2018 275%
    2017 200%
    2016 463%
  • 2019
  • 28 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2018 133%
    2017 87%
    2016 250%
  • 2018
  • 12 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2017 25%
    2016 50%
  • 2017
  • 15 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2016 88%
  • 2016
  • 8
  • SOVEREIGN
  • NONSOVEREIGN
  • NEW BORROWING MEMBERS
  • 73
  • 35
  • 28
  • 33 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2019 120%
    2018 313%
    2017 230%
    2016 371%
  • 12 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2018 8%
    2018 200%
    2017 140%
    2016 1100%
  • 7 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2019 14%
    2018 600%
    2017 40%
    2016 -
  • 15 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2018 88%
    2017 50%
    2016 114%
  • 13 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2018 225%
    2017 160%
    2016 1200%
  • 8 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2018 700%
    2017 60%
    2016 14%
  • 8 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2017 43%
    2016 14%
  • 4 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2017 25%
    2016 300%
  • 1 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2017 600%
    2016 400%
  • 10 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2016 43%
  • 5 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2016 400%
  • 5 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2016 40%
  • 7
  • 1
  • 7
Notes: "Borrowing Members" are Members with approved loans from AIIB.
Click to generate chart

Project Preparation Special Fund

Established in June 2016, the Project Preparation Special Fund (PPSF) is a multidonor facility with the primary purpose of supporting, through technical assistance grants, eligible AIIB members—especially low-income members—prepare bankable infrastructure projects that AIIB may finance. The grants allow clients to hire experts and consultants for project preparation activities critical to improve project quality and ensure bankability in terms of economic, environmental and social sustainability and implementation readiness.

At end-2020, total committed contributions to PPSF stood at USD128 million, all of which have been paid to AIIB.

Status of Commitments and Payments to the Project Preparation Special Fund (as of end-2020)
  • CONTRIBUTOR
  • COMMITTED CONTRIBUTIONS (USD)
  • PAID CONTRIBUTIONS (USD)
  • China
  • 50,000,000
  • 50,000,000
  • United Kingdom
  • 50,000,000
  • 50,000,000
  • Republic of Korea
  • 18,000,000
  • 18,000,000
  • Hong Kong, China
  • 10,000,000
  • 10,000,000
  • Total
  • 128,000,000
  • 128,000,000

Four new grants totaling USD14.13 million were approved in 2020, taking the total number of approved grants to 13 for USD25.44 million. A total of USD2.5 million was disbursed during 2020, with a cumulative disbursement of USD4.37 million since the inception of PPSF. Compared with 2019, disbursements gradually picked up in 2020 despite COVID-19–related challenges. However, the overall implementation progress on ongoing PPSF grants has slowed down because of COVID-19–related challenges (e.g., travel restrictions and lockdowns).

PPSF has provided project preparation support to a total of seven members—Bangladesh, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan—all of which are eligible for support from the International Development Association. Out of the 13 PPSF grants approved thus far, transport projects had four and projects in the energy, urban and water sectors had three each.

A total of three PPSF-supported projects have received AIIB financing. Two were approved by AIIB in 2019 and one in 2020. Table 8.2.2 shows that the three PPSF grants, totaling USD2.8 million, helped leverage a total of USD556.3 million of AIIB financing.

Approved Project Preparation Special Fund–Supported Projects
  • PROJECT NAME
  • MEMBER
  • PPSF GRANT
    AMOUNT (USD)
  • AIIB FINANCING
    AMOUNT (USD)
  • AIIB FINANCING
    APPROVAL YEAR
  • National Road 13 Improvement and
    Maintenance Project
  • Lao PDR
  • 995,000
  • 40,000,000
  • 2019
  • Power Distribution System Upgrade and
    Expansion Project
  • Nepal
  • 1,000,000
  • 112,300,000
  • 2019
  • Sylhet to Tamabil Road Upgradation Project
  • Bangladesh
  • 813,000
  • 404,000,000
  • 2020
  • Total
  • 2,808,000
  • 556,300,000
Lao PDR = Lao People’s Democratic Republic, PPSF = Project Preparation Special Fund.


On May 7, 2020, the Board of Directors approved the creation of the Special Fund Window under AIIB’s COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility and the reallocation of a total of USD30 million from PPSF to the Special Fund Window. At end-2020, a total of USD29.74 million had been approved for interest rate buy-down of four AIIB projects totaling USD217.3 million.

Projects Supported by the Special Fund Window
  • MEMBER
  • PROJECT NAME
  • AIIB FINANCING
    AMOUNT (USD MILLION)
  • BUY-DOWN
    AMOUNT (USD MILLION)
  • Maldives
  • COVID-19 Emergency Response and Health Systems Preparedness Project
  • 7.3
  • 0.87
  • Kyrgyz Republic
  • Emergency Support for Private and Financial Sector Project
  • 50.0
  • 8.87
  • Bangladesh
  • Bangladesh COVID-19 Emergency Response and Pandemic Preparedness Project
  • 100.0
  • 10.00
  • Cambodia
  • National Restoration of Rural Productive Capacity Project
  • 60.0
  • 10.00
  • Total
  • 217.3
  • 29.74

OUR CLIENTS

We invest in projects that deliver environmental improvements and contribute to climate action. We invest in projects that look at how technology improves governance, value, quality, productivity, efficiency, resilience, sustainability or inclusion. We invest in connectivity projects that strengthen trade, investment and digital or financial integration. We invest in projects where we can catalyze the mobilization of private capital.

Sustainable Development Goals and Climate Finance

Green Infrastructure
ENLARGE
2020 was a critical year: the COVID-19 pandemic threatened to reverse progress on sustainable development, which the global community had worked on together for years. In such times, sustainable infrastructure investment can catalyze long-term growth and social development. In 2020, even as AIIB continued to finance Infrastructure for Tomorrow, it joined peer multilateral development banks (MDBs) and other development partners to respond to the short-term urgent financing needs of clients to mitigate the pandemic’s immediate effects.

Through its COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility, AIIB swiftly responded to members’ health sector financing needs (Sustainable Development Goal), and helped members increase their economic resilience and loosen liquidity constraints. Global partnerships were more important than ever; AIIB worked closely with peer MDBs to coordinate the efficient and effective use of public resources in alleviating the financial constraints induced by the crisis, as highlighted in the Joint Report on Financing the Sustainable Development Goals, published by 12 MDBs, including AIIB.

At the same time, our infrastructure financing continued to be strongly aligned with four infrastructure-related SDGs:

AIIB continued to deploy innovative financing instruments to mobilize private capital for a broad range of sustainable infrastructure:

  • Keppel Asia Infrastructure Fund will invest in power, renewable energy and energy efficiency, telecommunications, transportation and logistics and social infrastructure projects in Asia-Pacific.
  • ADM Capital Elkhorn Emerging Asia Renewable Energy Fund is a first-of-its-kind private credit fund financing, targeting small and medium-sized enterprises and projects operating in the renewable energy and energy-efficiency sectors across emerging economies in Asia.
  • Lightsmith Climate Resilience Partners is a private equity fund investing in growth-stage technology companies that develop climate adaptation solutions, with the potential to generate significant benefits to AIIB members.
In its Corporate Strategy, AIIB sets its first climate finance target of reaching or surpassing by 2025 a 50-percent share in actual financing approvals. On par with peer MDBs, this ambitious target represents a milestone in the Bank’s commitment to climate actions to help its members achieve their domestic and international climate commitments, notably the nationally determined contributions under the Paris Agreement, by providing financial support for climate change mitigation and adaptation.

In 2020, AIIB approved USD10 billion financing to 45 projects in total, of which USD2.9 billion was for infrastructure projects not under the COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility. Despite a challenging year for infrastructure financing because of COVID-19, AIIB’s climate finance in 2020 totaled USD1.2 billion or 41 percent of total infrastructure financing approved, excluding projects financed through the Facility. The climate finance share would be 12 percent if Facility projects were included. Of 18 infrastructure projects approved in 2020, 13 had a climate finance component, of which seven had mitigation finance, four adaptation finance and two dual benefits. Compared with 2019 when our climate finance reached 39 percent, the Bank has managed to maintain a slightly increased climate finance share. AIIB’s climate finance projects can be mapped against SDG 13 (climate action).

AIIB’s 13 climate finance projects in 2020 were distributed across transport (four), energy (three), water (two), finance (two), urban (one) and information and communication technology (one), serving sovereign (seven) and nonsovereign (six) clients. AIIB's innovative financing instruments have mobilized private climate finance, such as the Lightsmith Climate Resilience Partners fund.

In tracking its climate finance, AIIB adheres to Common Principles for Climate Change Mitigation and Climate Change Adaptation Finance Tracking, jointly adopted by MDBs and the International Development Finance Club. In 2020, AIIB joined peer MDBs in collectively reporting climate finance figures (download the report here).

The Bank aims to achieve its 2025 climate finance target by scaling up efforts to develop and finance low-carbon, climate-resilient projects, in partnership with clients and cofinanciers from the public and private sector. AIIB will continue to be active in joint MDB working groups and in international fora on combatting climate change.