INFRASTRUCTURE FOR TOMORROW (i4t)

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2020 AIIB Annual Report and Financials
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Laying the Groundwork for Infrastructure for Tomorrow (i4t)

Many of us have a built-in desire for a better quality of life. This means accessible physical, digital and other social infrastructure. AIIB, its members and clients work together to finance infrastructure development, turning aspirations into reality. A major accomplishment of 2020 was aligning AIIB’s shareholders and team around a new vision, mission and strategic direction that will enable the Bank to live up to these aspirations.

Developing Our Corporate Strategy

“What kind of multilateral development bank will AIIB become?” has been asked since the Bank was just a concept in 2013. From the rich menu of development finance approaches the multilateral development bank family was offering, which one would AIIB follow? Would AIIB adopt a model distinctly different from that of its peers?

In 2018, we began developing the Corporate Strategy, aiming to finalize it in 2020 so that we could begin implementing it in 2021, the fifth anniversary of AIIB and the completion of our start-up phase.

We reached out to a broad set of external and internal stakeholders to exchange ideas on possible future directions for the institution. Shareholders reaffirmed their preference for AIIB to continue embracing the strong foundations that have contributed to its success. Formal Corporate Strategy discussions started in mid-2019 and AIIB staff established 10 focus groups on topics relevant for the Bank’s future. Discussions resulted in valuable recommendations.

The 2019 Board of Governors meeting was a critical point. Through a dedicated session on the Corporate Strategy, AIIB Governors shared their vision for future strategic directions, underlining the relevance of the Bank’s thematic priorities and highlighting the growing importance of technology to meet client needs. The event provided an opportunity to receive feedback from the Bank’s International Advisory Panel.

The Board of Directors met in September and December 2019 to further discuss the Corporate Strategy. The discussions not only provided guidance but also encouraged dialogue on how ambitious our strategic directions should be. Thus, the draft Corporate Strategy highlighted the importance of remaining flexible to respond to immediate client needs and to adapt the strategy to extraordinary situations that might occur during the 10-year strategy period.

The Corporate Strategy took its final form after feedback from the Board of Governors during the 2020 Annual Meeting and from the International Advisory Panel. The document was approved by the Board of Directors in September 2020 with strong support.

2021 will be the first year that our operations will be guided by the Corporate Strategy. It will be reviewed in 2025 to see if we should continue financing Infrastructure for Tomorrow.
Commitment to Sustainability

Building on accomplishments and lessons learned from our first five years of operations, we have developed the Corporate Strategy to set out the vision, mission and strategic directions of AIIB for its growth phase through 2030. Under the Corporate Strategy, we commit to sustainability by requiring all our investments to be the following:

  • Financially and economically sustainable. Economic and financial analyses should ensure that financial returns and economic impact generate positive economic returns and not exacerbate a member’s debt situation.
  • Socially sustainable and inclusive. Projects should have no negative impacts, direct or indirect, especially on displaced people, vulnerable groups and community health and safety. Social sustainability promotes inclusive access to project benefits for all citizens irrespective of age, gender, location, ethnicity and other socioeconomic characteristics, particularly for those who are often marginalized, vulnerable or excluded from access to such services.
  • Environmentally sustainable. Projects should have no negative impacts, direct or indirect, on the physical and biological environment such as water and air quality, biodiversity, local pollution, climate change and land and water use. Environmental and social sustainability is assured through our Environmental and Social Framework, which reflects good international practices.
This is the foundation of Infrastructure for Tomorrow.

Financing Infrastructure for Tomorrow (i4t)

ENLARGE
ACWA Power 2020
It has never been more urgent to imagine, plan and build Infrastructure for Tomorrow. Five megatrends are colliding to fundamentally reshape our world. First, increasing urbanization will expand the need for urban infrastructure. Second, demographic shifts will have significant implications for public service and social infrastructure and for more inclusive and accessible infrastructure services. Third, climate change and sustainability considerations will need to underpin investments across multiple sectors. Fourth, digital infrastructure and technological innovation are becoming more central to the economy and influencing user expectations and behavior, which will impact infrastructure demand. Fifth, regional trade and value chains will be increasingly more relevant.


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What is i4t

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We are already witnessing the influences of these five megatrends on infrastructure development in Asia, even though their full effects are still far from playing out in full. Asian economies must find ways to meet their growing and changing infrastructure needs under challenging conditions. Investing in forward-looking infrastructure at scale is the key bridge between today and a more sustainable and prosperous tomorrow. As articulated in our Corporate Strategy, Financing Infrastructure for Tomorrow is AIIB’s mission. We will prioritize investing in infrastructure and other productive sectors that add value through one of the four crosscutting themes of Infrastructure for Tomorrow: green infrastructure, connectivity and regional cooperation, technology-enabled infrastructure and private capital mobilization.

Our Thematic Priorities

Green Infrastructure
Green Infrastructure
ENLARGE
Climate change is one of the most pressing global challenges of this century. To steeply reduce global emissions and to adapt to climate change, infrastructure needs to be green. As a major contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions, Asia must take a sustainable development pathway to achieve the Paris Agreement objectives. Environmental improvement is key for the future of Asia as it is expected to be hit hard by climate change and environmental degradation if trends continue. The situation calls for substantial investments in green infrastructure. The increasing commitment of AIIB’s members to adapt to and mitigate the impact of climate change and solve local environmental problems has reinforced the Bank’s need to focus on green infrastructure.

Consistent with our mandate, we will continue to prioritize green infrastructure and help our members meet their environmental and related development goals by financing projects that improve the local environment and investments dedicated to climate action.

In 2020, we invested, directly or indirectly, in projects that promote energy access and security. We increased the availability of renewable power generation capacity, which helped reduce the carbon intensity of energy supply and dependence on fossil fuels to generate electricity. Finally, we helped AIIB members move to a more balanced and environmentally sustainable energy mix. Some of the projects follow:

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  • A transmission grid in Bangladesh, which will improve the reliability and efficiency of power transmission in Dhaka and the Western Zone and strengthen the institutional capacity of the Power Grid Company of Bangladesh. To mitigate climate change–related issues such as flooding and overheating of transmission lines, the project will feature indoor gas-insulated substations and high-efficiency, high-temperature and low-sag conductors.
  • The first and largest utility-scale solar project in Oman, with a total capacity of 500 megawatts (MW), to help diversify Oman’s energy mix and meet increasing demand for power brought about by sustained economic and population growth and the expansion of heavy industry.
  • A solar project in India being developed by a special-purpose vehicle. The project will add 250 MW of solar capacity—equivalent to about 519,776 tons of annual CO2 emission savings in its first year of operations in 2022—and help India meet its overall renewable energy capacity target.
AIIB’s support helps bridge the financing gap for projects with significant needs that cannot be met entirely by domestic banks or partner financing agencies, including multilateral development banks. Our participation strengthens project compliance with international standards for environmental and social safeguards.

Our support contributes to the greening of transport by promoting low-carbon transport models and incorporating climate-resilient design into our transport projects. Some green transport projects we approved in 2020 were

  • Izmir Metro Phase 4: Fahrettin Altay–Narlidere Kaymakamlık Line in Turkey.
  • Delhi-Meerut Regional Rapid Transit System Project in India.
  • Sylhet–Tamabil Road in Bangladesh.
We are financing solutions to develop sustainable cities and improve livability. As more cities become engines of economic growth and hubs of trade, city residents must contend with inadequate access to water and sanitation, unreliable power supply, traffic congestion, air and water pollution and a lack of decent shelter, especially for low-income groups. We recognize that sustainable development of cities requires balanced integration of many economic, financial, environmental and social considerations. Thus, we are investing in projects that protect and increase environmental sustainability (pollution reduction, climate mitigation, conservation and sustainable management of natural resources and biodiversity).

Our projects in this area include the following:

Green Infrastructure
ENLARGE
  • Helping the Government of Maldives develop a sustainable regional solid waste treatment system in Greater Malé. The project will ensure the safe disposal or recycling of waste, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions more than do landfills and generating electricity by turning waste to energy.
  • Working with the World Bank on two water and sanitation projects in Bangladesh (Dhaka Sanitation Improvement and Rural Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Human Capital Development Project).
  • Helping the Government of Uzbekistan provide the Bukhara Region with access to safely managed water and sanitation by constructing and rehabilitating intakes, main water lines, water treatment facilities, pumping stations and distribution networks.
We are committed to supporting our members’ efforts to ensure the availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals. 2020 saw the approval of our Water Strategy, which classifies investments as (1) improving access to water services, (2) increasing the availability and quality of water through improved resource management and (3) improving resilience to the impact of water-related disasters. These investments will be guided by AIIB’s mandate and thematic priorities and the following principles: (1) promoting sustainable infrastructure, (2) integrating resource management, (3) mobilizing private capital and efficiencies and (iv) adopting innovative technology.

Finally, we are investing in financial intermediaries that will, in turn, invest in subprojects that meet AIIB’s eligibility criteria and investment guidelines for green investments. Our participation in the ADM Capital [Elkhorn] Emerging Asia Renewable Energy Fund as an anchor investor will help mobilize private institutional capital that will provide small and medium-sized enterprises in emerging Asia with access to financing so they can continue to pursue renewable energy and energy-efficiency solutions.


Improving Infrastructure Connectivity in Asia and Regional Cooperation
Improving Infrastructure Connectivity in Asia and Regional Cooperation
ENLARGE
Improving infrastructure connectivity in Asia and promoting regional cooperation are key components of our mandate. Being connected is critical to economic development. Infrastructure for Tomorrow must close the gap between economies that are integrated globally and those that are not. With infrastructure unevenly developed across Asia, strengthening connectivity within and between Asian economies through targeted investments in transport, water, energy and digital networks would significantly strengthen competition, productivity and growth by increasing the flow of people, goods, services, capital and information. Promoting regional cooperation complements infrastructure connectivity by providing supplementary noneconomic benefits, including, but not limited to, greater information exchange, better policy alignment and stronger multilateral governance.

AIIB has highlighted connectivity and regional cooperation as one of four thematic priorities that will shape our investments in Infrastructure for Tomorrow under our Corporate Strategy. We will prioritize projects that expedite domestic and cross-border infrastructure connectivity within Asia and between Asia and the rest of the world. We will support projects that complement cross-border infrastructure connectivity by generating direct measurable benefits in boosting regional trade, investment, and digital and financial integration across economies. This thematic priority is applicable to all sectors, including transport, water, energy, urban and digital infrastructure.

Improving Infrastructure Connectivity in Asia and Regional Cooperation
ENLARGE
The Board of Directors approved AIIB assuming the role of Administrator of the Multilateral Cooperation Center for Development Finance (MCDF) Finance Facility, establishing and hosting the MCDF Secretariat and acting as an Implementing Partner of the MCDF Finance Facility once AIIB meets the criteria set out in the Governing Instrument of the MCDF Finance Facility. AIIB’s involvement is expected to augment the Bank’s capacity to help prepare regional connectivity investment projects.

Examples of connectivity projects we financed in 2020 include the following:

  • Improving cross-border connectivity between Bangladesh and India via a safe and efficient road link between Sylhet and Tamabil.
  • Enhancing road efficiency, safety and climate resilience of major international cross-border roads in Bukhara and road networks in Karakalpakstan and Khorezm in Uzbekistan
  • Promoting socioeconomic development within Lao PDR and better connectivity with Thailand, Viet Nam and China through better road conditions, safety and climate resilience of a vital transport route.
Private Capital Mobilization
PrivateCapital-Mob_Projects
ENLARGE
Private capital mobilization is essential to realizing our mandate, particularly meeting the vast infrastructure financing needs that far exceed the fiscal capacity of governments and balance sheets of multilateral development banks. Notwithstanding the extensive private financing that could potentially be attracted, current participation of private capital in Asian infrastructure is low. Private financing is still predominantly provided by banks, and the large Asian institutional investor pool remains untapped. AIIB’s catalytic role is important to increase private and other investors’ appetite for investing in emerging market infrastructure and in productive sectors associated with and complementary to core infrastructure. Our catalytic role is even more important during times of increased financial distress and economic downturns, when private capital withdraws from developing economies.

This thematic priority is about AIIB seeking to maximize private capital mobilization (directly and indirectly) in sectors within our mandate through project transactions. We have been originating private sector transactions and expanding our financing instruments to mobilize private capital for projects. We do this through financial intermediaries and in investments that help develop capital markets and/or promote infrastructure as an asset class.

PrivateCapital-Mob_Projects
ENLARGE
In 2020, we made the following project investments:

  • A loan to support electricity generation from solar energy resources in India to finance a 250-megawatt (MW) solar project being developed in the Ananthapuramu Ultra Mega Solar Park in Anantapur district, Andhra Pradesh, through a special-purpose vehicle awarded through a competitive bid. The project will result in clean energy generation of 592 gigawatt hours annually and achieve 519,776 tons of annual CO2 emission savings in its first year of operations (FY2022). We mobilized private capital from sponsors and investors and through cofinancing from the State Bank of India, a significant lender in the infrastructure financing space.
  • A loan to support a build, own and operate model to develop the Oman Ibri II 500 MW Solar PV Independent Power Plant Project in Oman. The project seeks to increase the availability of renewable power generation capacity and improve the balance between supply and demand during the peak hours of Oman’s Main Interconnected System grid, which serves Muscat and northern Oman. The solar power plant will reduce Oman’s dependence on gas and other fossil fuels for electricity generation and allow the country to shift to a more balanced and environmentally sustainable energy mix. The project is the largest solar farm to date in Oman and is cofinanced with several international and regional lenders, with AIIB leading direct private capital mobilization.
We work with financial intermediaries such as banks, funds and investment platforms to provide crucial access to finance for infrastructure projects if the arrangement is more efficient. This structure is helpful for establishing and deepening long-term partnerships with credible infrastructure investors and financial institutions. AIIB conducts equity investments, including indirect equity through externally managed funds. Equity investments are an important tool to help AIIB realize our mandate to foster sustainable infrastructure and achieve development outcomes in our members, mainly by mobilizing private capital but also in other ways.

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About Our Other Investments Through Financial Intermediaries

ADM Capital [Elkhorn] Emerging Asia Renewable Energy Fund

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Lightsmith Climate Resilience Partners

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About Our Capital Market Creation Investments

Asia Climate Bond Portfolio (with Amundi)

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Infrastructure Private Capital Mobilization Platform (with Clifford Capital)

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In 2020, we made the following investments through financial intermediaries:

  • A line of credit to the Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited (HDFC) to finance the acquisition and construction of affordable housing units in India. The loan will be used for on-lending to individuals and private developers to develop, construct or acquire low-cost, affordable housing subprojects in urban and semi-urban areas. As an anchor investor, AIIB can potentially mobilize up to USD300 million in private capital from other financial institutions.
  • An equity investment in the Keppel Asia Infrastructure Fund and a co-investment sleeve that invests in a broad range of infrastructure sectors, with a focus on emerging markets in Asia, including renewable energy, energy efficiency, telecommunications, transport and social infrastructure. We will be able to diversify the geographic and sector coverage of our equity portfolio across our members while positively influencing the fund manager’s investment policies and environmental and social management system. The AIIB brand as a multilateral financial institution focused on sustainable infrastructure investment in Asia can potentially crowd other institutional investors into the fund. Capital can be mobilized through the fund’s equity investments, which generate debt-financing opportunities for infrastructure investors.
Creating capital markets and mobilizing institutional investors to finance infrastructure will substantially reduce the funding gap and complement other efforts to promote financing of individual projects. Investors will have opportunities when fiscally constrained governments consider asset recycling or privatization, and private companies may choose to exit some projects and shift to new investments promising better asset performance. Such asset-recycling opportunities could become more prominent as companies may wish to take advantage of low interest rates.

Our Corporate Strategy specifies that AIIB will meet client needs for recycling public and private infrastructure assets through the following:

  • Supporting the development of infrastructure-related capital markets and associated products
  • Building capacity and joining reputable public and private partners in innovating in local currency capital markets
  • Increasing our capacity, network and activities in syndication, structured finance and other means to monetize infrastructure assets and funds
Empowering Our Clients through Digital Infrastructure and Broader Technology-Enabled Infrastructure
ENLARGE
Technology-enabled infrastructure is the latest addition to our thematic priorities as defined in our Corporate Strategy. Established in the digital era, AIIB can play a major role in helping clients transform their infrastructure sectors through innovative technological applications. “Digital everything” will touch all aspects of human activity, from autonomous transport, health care and finance to social activities. The COVID-19 pandemic has no doubt accelerated the shift to digital technology, but it has also exposed major digital divides between and within countries. Many countries have large urban-rural variations in digitization opportunities and users may face patchy or disrupted services. Many governments recognize that digital access is both an economic and a social imperative. Thanks to digitization and new building and engineering techniques, the potential to improve infrastructure efficiency and productivity is vast. Thus, as part of Infrastructure for Tomorrow, we support projects where applying the best available technologies delivers better value, quality, productivity, efficiency, resilience, sustainability, inclusion, transparency or better governance along the full project life cycle.

When discussing technology for the future, we need to embrace both technology-enabled and digital infrastructure, which complement each other but refer to different things. Technology-enabled infrastructure, a thematic priority of our Corporate Strategy, recognizes the importance of enabling Infrastructure for Tomorrow with prudent technology applications. Digital infrastructure supports the digital economy and consists of hard (connectivity and data infrastructure) and soft (digital platforms and terminals) components.

Technology-enabled infrastructure uses technology to enable Infrastructure for Tomorrow. Technology-enabled infrastructure includes all technologies, not just digital (for example, artificial intelligence, big data, 5G, Internet of Things, virtual reality and augmented reality), but also other engineering, scientific, business and innovative technologies (for example, battery storage, modular construction, new building materials, drones, robotics, 3D printing).

AIIB is investing in the development of technology-enabled infrastructure and financing the application of technology. We do this by leveraging public-private partnerships, working with private capital and encouraging innovation through co-investment vehicles.

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As an example, AIIB is investing in an entity that will, in turn, invest in companies that develop technology-enabled infrastructure. Lightsmith Climate Resilience Partners is a specialist growth private equity fund focusing on global climate resilience technology solutions. The fund makes growth equity investments in technology companies that build resilience to the physical damage and disruption, risk and volatility and resource scarcity resulting from climate change. The fund has the first dedicated private equity investment strategy focused on climate resilience and adaptation technology solutions.

In 2020, we adopted the Digital Infrastructure Sector Strategy, which defines our investment objectives in hard and soft digital infrastructure and the investment principles that will guide how we prioritize investments. The strategy covers the infrastructure needed to enable the digital economy (mobile towers, fiber networks, data centers, among others) or the use of digital technology to make infrastructure smart (smart energy management or the use of machine learning and artificial intelligence to enable traffic management).

AIIB has worked and is working with our members on the following digital infrastructure projects:

  • The construction and operation of the first phase of a nationwide fiber broadband network in Oman
  • The installation of about 2,000 kilometers of metro and regional fiber-optic backbone networks to provide wider coverage within major cities and across suburban and rural areas in Cambodia
  • The construction of a multifunctional satellite that will provide much-needed broadband internet service to more than 45 million people in 149,400 unserved public service points. These areas include schools, hospitals and local government locations in some of the least developed regions of Indonesia.
Project Data (excluding the COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility)
Project Data

Approved Projects by Thematic Priority, Year 2020
  • YEAR
  • SUSTAINABLE
  • CROSS-BORDER
  • PRIVATE CAPITAL
  • TOTAL (as of Dec. 31, 2020)
  • 56
  • 11
  • 34
  • 2020
  • 15 Sustainable

    % Change

    2019 47%
    2018 88%
    2017 67%
    2016 650%
  • 4 Cross-Border

    % Change

    2019 100%
    2018 -
    2017 300%
    2016 -
  • 8 Private Capital

    % Change

    2019 63%
    2018 33%
    2017 60%
    2016 300%
  • 2019
  • 22 Sustainable

    % Change

    2018 175%
    2017 144%
    2016 1000%
  • 2 Cross-Border

    % Change

    2018 -
    2017 100%
    2016 100%
  • 13 Private Capital

    % Change

    2018 117%
    2017 160%
    2016 550%
  • 2018
  • 8 Sustainable

    % Change

    2017 13%
    2016 300%
  • 0 Cross-Border

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 6 Private Capital

    % Change

    2017 20%
    2016 200%
  • 2017
  • 9 Sustainable

    % Change

    2016 350%
  • 1 Cross-Border

    % Change

    2016 300%
  • 5 Private Capital

    % Change

    2016 150%
  • 2016
  • 2
  • 4
  • 2
Note: In September 2020, AIIB approved its Corporate Strategy and identified technology-enabled infrastructure as an additional thematic priority. From 2021, the Bank will track project alignment to four thematic priorities.
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Approved Projects by Financing Type, Year 2020
  • YEAR
  • ANNUAL APPROVALS
  • TOTAL (as of Dec. 31, 2020)
  • 108
  • 2020
  • 45 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2019 61%
    2018 275%
    2017 200%
    2016 463%
  • 2019
  • 28 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2018 133%
    2017 87%
    2016 250%
  • 2018
  • 12 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2017 25%
    2016 50%
  • 2017
  • 15 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2016 88%
  • 2016
  • 8
  • SOVEREIGN
  • NONSOVEREIGN
  • NEW BORROWING MEMBERS
  • 73
  • 35
  • 28
  • 33 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2019 120%
    2018 313%
    2017 230%
    2016 371%
  • 12 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2018 8%
    2018 200%
    2017 140%
    2016 1100%
  • 7 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2019 14%
    2018 600%
    2017 40%
    2016 -
  • 15 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2018 88%
    2017 50%
    2016 114%
  • 13 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2018 225%
    2017 160%
    2016 1200%
  • 8 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2018 700%
    2017 60%
    2016 14%
  • 8 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2017 43%
    2016 14%
  • 4 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2017 25%
    2016 300%
  • 1 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2017 600%
    2016 400%
  • 10 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2016 43%
  • 5 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2016 400%
  • 5 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2016 40%
  • 7
  • 1
  • 7
Notes: "Borrowing Members" are Members with approved loans from AIIB.
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Distribution of Approved Projects by Sector, Year 2020
  • YEAR
  • ENERGY
  • TRANSPORT
  • WATER
  • FINANCE
  • TOTAL
    (as of Dec. 31, 2020)
  • 22
  • 18
  • 11
  • 18
  • 2020
  • 3 Energy

    % Change

    2019 133%
    2018 50%
    2017 100%
    2016 33%
  • 5 Transport

    % Change

    2019 25%
    2018 67%
    2017 67%
    2016 67%
  • 3 Water

    % Change

    2019 -
    2018 -
    2017 50%
    2016 -
  • 3 Finance

    % Change

    2019 200%
    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 2019
  • 7 Energy

    % Change

    2018 250%
    2017 17%
    2016 75%
  • 4 Transport

    % Change

    2018 33%
    2017 33%
    2016 33%
  • 3 Water

    % Change

    2018 -
    2017 50%
    2016 -
  • 9 Finance

    % Change

    2018 200%
    2017 200%
    2016 -
  • 2018
  • 2 Energy

    % Change

    2017 200%
    2016 100%
  • 3 Transport

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 3 Water

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 50%
  • 3 Finance

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 2017
  • 6 Energy

    % Change

    2016 50%
  • 3 Transport

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 2 Water

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 3 Finance

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 2016
  • 4
  • 3
  • 0
  • 0
  • URBAN
  • INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY
  • RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE AND AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
  • OTHERS
  • 5
  • 5
  • 1
  • 28
  • 1 Urban

    % Change

    2019 100%
    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 3 ICT

    % Change

    2019 200%
    2018 -
    2017 200%
    2016 -
  • 0 Rural Infra-Structure and Agricultural Development

    % Change

    2019 -
    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 27* Others

    % Change

    2019 2600%
    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 2 Urban

    % Change

    2018 100%
    2017 -
    2016 100%
  • 1 ICT

    % Change

    2018  
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 1 Rural Infra-Structure and Agricultural Development

    % Change

    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 1** Others

    % Change

    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 1 Urban

    % Change

    2017 100%
    2016 -
  • 0 ICT

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 0 Rural Infra-Structure and Agricultural Development

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 0 Others

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 0 Urban

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 1 ICT

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 0 Rural Infra-Structure and Agricultural Development

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 0 Others

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
* Projects under the COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility: public health (8), finance and liquidity (7) and economic resilience (12).
** Sri Lanka: Reduction of Landslide Vulnerability by Mitigation Measures.
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