2020 AIIB ANNUAL REPORT AND FINANCIALS

Share a section of the page
SHARE
DOWNLOAD REPORT
DOWNLOAD FINANCIALS

Who We Are and What We Do

Related Topics

What We Do / How We Do It / Why We Do It

LEARN MORE
Extraordinary times call for extraordinary measures, and 2020 was an extraordinary year. Our founding members built adaptability into our Charter to enable AIIB to be responsive to the region’s changing demands. And 2020 put this attribute to the test. This is our story: how being born resilient and agile empowered us to help our clients at a time of great need.

We are a multilateral development bank (MDB) based in Asia, with an international membership. Our members represent about 79 percent of the global population and 65 percent of global gross domestic product (GDP). We are self-governing, rules- and treaty-based, AAA-rated, with preferred creditor status.

Our Mandate
AIIB’s VISION is a prosperous Asia based on sustainable economic development and regional cooperation.

AIIB’s MISSION is financing Infrastructure for Tomorrow. By investing in sustainable infrastructure, we unlock new capital, new technologies and new ways in which to address climate change and to connect Asia, and the world. We will achieve this working with partners. By being agile and adaptable, we will meet client needs and operate to the highest standards.
2020 at a glance 2020 at a glance

Historical Data

  • YEAR
  • ANNUAL APPROVALS
  • TOTAL (as of Dec. 31, 2020)
  • 108
  • 2020
  • 45 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2019 61%
    2018 275%
    2017 200%
    2016 463%
  • 2019
  • 28 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2018 133%
    2017 87%
    2016 250%
  • 2018
  • 12 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2017 25%
    2016 50%
  • 2017
  • 15 Projects (Annual Approvals)

    % Change

    2016 88%
  • 2016
  • 8
  • SOVEREIGN
  • NONSOVEREIGN
  • NEW BORROWING MEMBERS
  • 73
  • 35
  • 28
  • 33 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2019 120%
    2018 313%
    2017 230%
    2016 371%
  • 12 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2018 8%
    2018 200%
    2017 140%
    2016 1100%
  • 7 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2019 14%
    2018 600%
    2017 40%
    2016 -
  • 15 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2018 88%
    2017 50%
    2016 114%
  • 13 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2018 225%
    2017 160%
    2016 1200%
  • 8 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2018 700%
    2017 60%
    2016 14%
  • 8 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2017 43%
    2016 14%
  • 4 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2017 25%
    2016 300%
  • 1 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2017 600%
    2016 400%
  • 10 Projects (Sovereign)

    % Change

    2016 43%
  • 5 Projects (Nonsovereign)

    % Change

    2016 400%
  • 5 Projects (New Borrowing Members)

    % Change

    2016 40%
  • 7
  • 1
  • 7
Notes: "Borrowing Members" are Members with approved loans from AIIB.
Click to generate chart
  • YEAR
  • SUSTAINABLE
  • CROSS-BORDER
  • PRIVATE CAPITAL
  • TOTAL (as of Dec. 31, 2020)
  • 56
  • 11
  • 34
  • 2020
  • 15 Sustainable

    % Change

    2019 47%
    2018 88%
    2017 67%
    2016 650%
  • 4 Cross-Border

    % Change

    2019 100%
    2018 -
    2017 300%
    2016 -
  • 8 Private Capital

    % Change

    2019 63%
    2018 33%
    2017 60%
    2016 300%
  • 2019
  • 22 Sustainable

    % Change

    2018 175%
    2017 144%
    2016 1000%
  • 2 Cross-Border

    % Change

    2018 -
    2017 100%
    2016 100%
  • 13 Private Capital

    % Change

    2018 117%
    2017 160%
    2016 550%
  • 2018
  • 8 Sustainable

    % Change

    2017 13%
    2016 300%
  • 0 Cross-Border

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 6 Private Capital

    % Change

    2017 20%
    2016 200%
  • 2017
  • 9 Sustainable

    % Change

    2016 350%
  • 1 Cross-Border

    % Change

    2016 300%
  • 5 Private Capital

    % Change

    2016 150%
  • 2016
  • 2
  • 4
  • 2
Note: In September 2020, AIIB approved its Corporate Strategy and identified technology-enabled infrastructure as an additional thematic priority. From 2021, the Bank will track project alignment to four thematic priorities.
Click to generate chart
  • YEAR
  • ENERGY
  • TRANSPORT
  • WATER
  • FINANCE
  • TOTAL
    (as of Dec. 31, 2020)
  • 22
  • 18
  • 11
  • 18
  • 2020
  • 3 Energy

    % Change

    2019 133%
    2018 50%
    2017 100%
    2016 33%
  • 5 Transport

    % Change

    2019 25%
    2018 67%
    2017 67%
    2016 67%
  • 3 Water

    % Change

    2019 -
    2018 -
    2017 50%
    2016 -
  • 3 Finance

    % Change

    2019 200%
    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 2019
  • 7 Energy

    % Change

    2018 250%
    2017 17%
    2016 75%
  • 4 Transport

    % Change

    2018 33%
    2017 33%
    2016 33%
  • 3 Water

    % Change

    2018 -
    2017 50%
    2016 -
  • 9 Finance

    % Change

    2018 200%
    2017 200%
    2016 -
  • 2018
  • 2 Energy

    % Change

    2017 200%
    2016 100%
  • 3 Transport

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 3 Water

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 50%
  • 3 Finance

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 2017
  • 6 Energy

    % Change

    2016 50%
  • 3 Transport

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 2 Water

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 3 Finance

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 2016
  • 4
  • 3
  • 0
  • 0
  • URBAN
  • INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY
  • RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE AND AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
  • OTHERS
  • 5
  • 5
  • 1
  • 28
  • 1 Urban

    % Change

    2019 100%
    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 3 ICT

    % Change

    2019 200%
    2018 -
    2017 200%
    2016 -
  • 0 Rural Infra-Structure and Agricultural Development

    % Change

    2019 -
    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 27* Others

    % Change

    2019 2600%
    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 2 Urban

    % Change

    2018 100%
    2017 -
    2016 100%
  • 1 ICT

    % Change

    2018  
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 1 Rural Infra-Structure and Agricultural Development

    % Change

    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 1** Others

    % Change

    2018 -
    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 1 Urban

    % Change

    2017 100%
    2016 -
  • 0 ICT

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 0 Rural Infra-Structure and Agricultural Development

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 0 Others

    % Change

    2017 -
    2016 -
  • 0 Urban

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 1 ICT

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 0 Rural Infra-Structure and Agricultural Development

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 0 Others

    % Change

    2016 -
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
* Projects under the COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility: public health (8), finance and liquidity (7) and economic resilience (12).
** Sri Lanka: Reduction of Landslide Vulnerability by Mitigation Measures.
Click to generate chart
  • YEAR
  • ANNUAL APPROVALS*
  • DISBURSED**
  • TOTAL (as of Dec. 31, 2020)
  • USD22.02 billion
  • USD9.13 billion
  • 2020
  • USD9.98 billion Investements

    % Change

    2019 124%
    2018 202%
    2017 299%
    2016 491%
  • USD6.23 billion Disbursed**

    % Change

    2019 321%
    2018 905%
    2017 689%
    2016 62200%
  • 2019
  • USD4.54 billion Investements

    % Change

    2018 37%
    2017 82%
    2016 169%
  • USD1.48 billion Disbursed**

    % Change

    2018 139%
    2017 87%
    2016 14700%
  • 2018
  • USD3.31 billion Investements

    % Change

    2017 32%
    2016 96%
  • USD0.62 billion Disbursed**

    % Change

    2017 27%
    2016 6100%
  • 2017
  • USD2.50 billion Investements

    % Change

    2016 48%
  • USD0.79 billion Disbursed**

    % Change

    2016 7800%
  • 2016
  • USD1.69 billion
  • USD0.01 billion
* Maximum amount approved.
** Amount of cash disbursement and capitalized charges.
Click to generate chart
  • YEAR
  • TOTAL APPROVED*
  • REGIONAL
  • NONREGIONAL
  • End-2020
  • 103 Total

    % Change

    2019 1%
    2018 11%
    2017 23%
    2016 81%
  • 50 Regional

    % Change

    2019 -
    2018 -
    2017 4%
    2016 35%
  • 53 Nonregional

    % Change

    2019 2%
    2018 23%
    2017 47%
    2016 165%
  • End-2019
  • 102 Total

    % Change

    2018 10%
    2017 21%
    2016 79%
  • 50 Regional

    % Change

    2018 -
    2017 4%
    2016 35%
  • 52 Nonregional

    % Change

    2017 21%
    2017 44%
    2016 160%
  • End-2018
  • 93 Total

    % Change

    2017 11%
    2016 63%
  • 50 Regional

    % Change

    2017 4%
    2016 35%
  • 43 Nonregional

    % Change

    2017 19%
    2016 115%
  • End-2017
  • 84 Total

    % Change

    2016 47%
  • 48 Regional

    % Change

    2016 30%
  • 36 Nonregional

    % Change

    2016 80%
  • End-2016
  • 57
  • 37
  • 20
* Aggregated, including members and approved members. As of end-2020, AIIB approved membership totaled 83 with 20 more that have either signed the AIIB Articles of Agreement, pending ratification, or whose membership applications have been approved by the Board of Governors, pending their ratification of the AIIB Articles of Agreement and/or required payment for their subscribed capital stock of the Bank (commonly known as prospective members).
Click to generate chart
  • YEAR
  • TOTAL PROFESSIONAL STAFF
  • FEMALE PROFESSIONAL STAFF
  • NATIONALITIES REPRESENTED
  • End-2020
  • 316 Total Professional Staff

    % Change

    2019 13%
    2018 70%
    2017 141%
    2016 300%
  • 121 (38% of total) Female Professional Staff

    % Change

    2019 12%
    2018 105%
    2017 188%
    2016 572%
  • 54 Nationalities Represented

    % Change

    2019 8%
    2018 64%
    2017 50%
    2016 135%
  • End-2019
  • 279 Total Professional Staff

    % Change

    2018 50%
    2017 113%
    2016 253%
  • 108 (39% of total) Female Professional Staff

    % Change

    2018 83%
    2017 157%
    2016 500%
  • 50 Nationalities Represented

    % Change

    2018 14%
    2017 39%
    2016 117%
  • End-2018
  • 186 Total Professional Staff

    % Change

    2017 42%
    2016 135%
  • 59 (32% of total) Female Professional Staff

    % Change

    2017 40%
    2016 228%
  • 44 Nationalities Represented

    % Change

    2017 22%
    2016 91%
  • End-2017
  • 131 Total Professional Staff

    % Change

    2016 66%
  • 42 (32% of total) Female Professional Staff

    % Change

    2016 133%
  • 36 Nationalities Represented

    % Change

    2016 57%
  • End-2016
  • 79
  • 18 (23% of total)
  • 23
Note: The figures are aggregated.
Click to generate chart
  • YEAR
  • COMMITMENT CONTRIBUTIONS
  • PREPARATION GRANTS APPROVED
  • End-2020
  • USD128 million Commitment Contributions

    % Change

    2019 -
    2018 -
    2017 19%
    2016 121%
  • USD25.44 million Preparation Grants Approved

    % Change

    2018 125%
    2018 254%
    2017 1396%
    2016 -
  • End-2019
  • USD128 million Commitment Contributions

    % Change

    2018 -
    2017 19%
    2016 121%
  • USD11.31 million Preparation Grants Approved

    % Change

    2018 58%
    2017 565%
    2016 -
  • End-2018
  • USD128 million Commitment Contributions

    % Change

    2017 19%
    2016 121%
  • USD7.18 million Preparation Grants Approved

    % Change

    2017 322%
    2016 -
  • End-2017
  • USD108 million Commitment Contributions

    % Change

    2016 86%
  • USD1.70 million Preparation Grants Approved

    % Change

    2016 -
  • End-2016
  • USD58 million
Note: Special Fund refers to grants provided by AIIB through its Project Preparation Fund to support the preparation of projects to be financed by AIIB. See Section 8.2 for more information.
Click to generate chart
  • YEAR
  • COMMITMENT CONTRIBUTIONS
  • TOTAL
  • 2020
  • USD1,450.1 million Commitment Contributions

    % Change

    2019 23%
    2018 867%
    2017 158%
    2016 29136%
  • USD3,344.46 million Total

    % Change

    2019 76%
    2018 367%
    2017 491%
    2016 67329%
  • 2019
  • USD1,178.4 million Commitment Contributions

    % Change

    2018 686%
    2017 110%
    2016 23658%
  • USD1,894.36 million Total

    % Change

    2018 165%
    2017 235%
    2016 38093%
  • 2018
  • USD150 million Commitment Contributions

    % Change

    2017 274%
    2016 2924%
  • USD715.96 million Total

    % Change

    2017 27%
    2016 14335%
  • 2017
  • USD561 million Commitment Contributions

    % Change

    2016 11210%
  • USD565.96 million Total

    % Change

    2016 11310%
  • 2016
  • USD4.96 million
  • USD4.96 million
Note: Private capital mobilized includes direct and indirect involvement of AIIB that led to the commitment of private entities’ financing.
Click to generate chart
  • YEAR
  • ANNUAL CONTRACT AWARD
  • TOTAL
  • 2020
  • USD1,336.8 million Annual Contract Award

    % Change

    2019 6%
    2018 708%
    2017 238%
  • USD3,797.7 million total

    % Change

    2019 54%
    2018 262%
    2017 329%
  • 2019
  • USD1,410.4 million* Annual Contract Award

    % Change

    2018 752%
    2017 256%
  • USD2,460.9 million* Annual Contract Award

    % Change

    2018 134%
    2017 178%
  • 2018
  • USD165.5 million Annual Contract Award

    % Change

    2017 139%
  • USD1,050.5 million Annual Contract Award

    % Change

    2017 19%
  • 2017
  • USD396 million
  • USD885 million
Note: International open competitive tendering procurement is used for sovereign-backed stand-alone and cofinanced investments.
* Updated to account for newly available information.
Click to generate chart

From Our President

AIIB President
ENLARGE
The year 2020 will go down in history as an exceptional period, fraught with suffering that will be etched into humanity’s consciousness for decades to come. Without warning, the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic spread across human society. No country could have escaped its ferocity. The virus’s severe infectiousness, deadly virulence and insidious ability to mutate render it extremely difficult to defeat. The international community has risen to the challenge, demonstrating its agility, courage, determination, resilience and solidarity under these extreme circumstances. And the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), along with its comparator institutions, has been an energetic combatant in the war against the coronavirus.

The COVID-19 pandemic has drawn attention to the critical need for international cooperation when dealing with crises of this magnitude. Global challenges call for global efforts. A multilateral development bank (MDB) has the advantage of being able to coordinate all its Members to mobilize concerted efforts to withstand such a shock as the COVID-19 pandemic.

We have consistently espoused and supported global cooperation to solve the world’s biggest problems. Close collaboration has augmented our impact. The speed at which capital and equipment were mobilized globally in 2020 showcased the efficacy of multilateralism when it is brought into full play.

The outbreak of the pandemic posed a tough question to AIIB. As an MDB, clearly, not to respond is not an option. But as an infrastructure investment bank, we needed to determine the best way for us to respond.

Our founders foresaw the unexpected. AIIB’s Articles of Agreement provide for it. Our Board of Directors and Management team quickly reached consensus on the right approach to participating in the global war against the COVID-19 pandemic.

AIIB’s Articles of Agreement are a forward-looking document, which governs the way the Management runs the Bank and navigates exceptional circumstances under the Board’s guidance and supervision. AIIB’s purpose is, in part, to “address development challenges by working in close collaboration with other multilateral and bilateral development institutions.” While infrastructure financing is AIIB’s mainstream business, it has a mandate sufficiently broad to cover other productive sectors.

In 2020, there was no bigger challenge to development than the economic and health crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. When the coronavirus brought global production to a screeching halt, nothing was more important than crushing the virus as a short-term measure and strengthening the health care sector as a long-term strategy. A health care system is an integral component of a nation’s productivity. Only a healthy nation is productive.

From that moment on, AIIB’s Board, Management and all the Members have worked in full alignment to tackle the coronavirus during these unprecedented times. We launched the COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility, an innovative financing modality, reinforcing further our partnership with other MDBs. Most importantly, it demonstrated how critical it is for MDBs to inject countercyclical financing to reduce liquidity constraints and bolster up economic resilience around the world.

COVID-19 lifted the veil on the cracks in the global economic and public health system. Every productive sector and every health-care system in every region were hit without exception, albeit to varying degrees of severity. A few came through relatively unscathed, but others buckled under the pressure. The global health sector was strained to the breaking point, fully exposed as the weakest link. Woeful underfunding over the decades has taken its toll on neglected health care systems in many countries, developed and developing alike. Lockdowns were enforced worldwide to help relieve the overworked health-care workers and ease excessive pressure on health care infrastructure.

It is a lesson we will not soon forget and one we have taken to heart at AIIB. Fully appreciating the importance of the health sector for economic growth, our Board of Directors provided full support to the Senior Management in formulating our Corporate Strategy, which focuses on core infrastructure financing and which, as AIIB matures, will gradually expand the Bank’s capacity, role and value-add in social infrastructure and other productive sectors.

In 2020, the Management was forced to split its attention between navigating the rough and tumble of the turbulence of the pandemic while preparing the roadmap for the Bank’s operations a decade into the future. To develop the Corporate Strategy, we in AIIB gathered diverse opinions and considered development objectives from around the world. As an MDB with a global membership but an Asian focus, and as an MDB that is implementing new development frameworks and financing modalities, AIIB adopted its Corporate Strategy to identify common ground on the kind of Asia we all want to see. Our thoughts galvanized around the idea of investing in infrastructure with sustainability at its core, the idea that AIIB should not follow the beaten track of infrastructure investment of the past but rather blaze trails in building Infrastructure for Tomorrow. Our strategy aims at reversing environmental degradation, financing climate change mitigation and adaptation, meeting the need of changing demographics and harnessing the transformative power of technology.

We have striven to build our Bank with signatory features: strong governance, environmental stewardship, connectivity, inclusivity and economic productivity. As we head towards 2030, we should steer our institution unswervingly in the direction in which our Corporate Strategy guides us. It is my firm conviction that our approach will enable us to contribute significantly to the sustainable economic growth and social development of our Members in Asia and beyond.

I am grateful to the Board of Governors for the support they have lent to me for my second term as President and Chair of the Board of Directors. I regard this as a great credit to the Senior Management team and the staff as a whole. I am deeply committed to our great institution. I am confident and optimistic about our potential because I have unqualified faith in the ability of our team to translate our ambitious goals into tangible results that can materially improve the wellbeing of the people of our members. This implies an immense amount of work ahead of us.

In 2021, I will focus on developing AIIB’s corporate culture as the immediate task to accomplish, while embarking on implementing our Corporate Strategy in all its dimensions. A key tenet of our strategic approach is to embed our client-first principle into the Bank’s institutional consciousness. Thinking openly about how we can improve our processes, products and communications for the sake of our clients and Members must become core to the hallmark AIIB way.

Our clients in the public and private sectors are the key partners for our development endeavors. We do not regard our close bond with them as a mere lender-borrower relationship that lasts no longer than a project’s life cycle. Our association with other partners is cemented by a kinship of development genes. Without their partnership and trust, we could not serve the purpose set for AIIB by our founding Members. I will work closely with the Board of Directors, the Management team and staff to implement the basic principles of learning, inclusivity and creativity in our daily work. These elements will support our efforts to be known as a development partner that is reliable, responsive and agile. We are striving to help clients meet their objectives. And we will stay true to AIIB’s mission to invest in Infrastructure for Tomorrow, upholding our core values of Lean, Clean and Green. I believe that fostering a corporate culture reflecting our common aspirations for a workplace is one of my most important jobs as President.

I will remember 2020 as the most challenging of years. Many of our staff were separated from their families for extended periods. Some were bereaved of their beloved ones but could not go back for the funeral. And others could not stay by their parents’ sick bed and give them help and comfort. However, all of our staff continued to work under extremely difficult circumstances to help our Members grappling with the pandemic. I am deeply touched by their personal sacrifice and commitment. I cannot overstate my gratitude to our dedicated staff. They are the pride of our institution.

The tragic loss of lives and disruptions to livelihoods and businesses in 2020 alert us to the vulnerability of our Members, regardless of their respective stages of development. That is exactly why we are here as an MDB. AIIB is committed to helping our Members and clients build, strengthen or upgrade their health-care systems. We will expedite cross border investments so neighbors work together rather than shut each other out. We will inject liquidity into the system to support infrastructure and help productive sectors tackle traumatic economic shocks. We will do this by unlocking new capital, new technologies and new ways of mitigating climate change and connecting Asia and the rest of the world.

This is our commitment for the new decade, and we look forward to engaging more development partners on our journey.


Jin Liqun
President and Chair of the Board of Directors

From Our Board of Directors

Our Board of Directors
ENLARGE FOR CAPTIONS
2020 was a year like no other. A global crisis of such magnitude tested the governance, management and operations of every organization. For one still shy of its fifth anniversary, AIIB faced this unprecedented challenge at an early stage in its development.

Thanks to the foresight of AIIB’s Chief Negotiators, our Bank was designed to be adaptive and swiftly respond to our members’ changing needs. Although our Chief Negotiators may never have expected AIIB to leverage its agile design so soon, their approach allowed the Board of Directors and Management to quickly adjust lending to meet the immediate needs of AIIB members during these unprecedented times.

It was a challenge AIIB’s corporate culture and governance framework were designed for. The Bank’s nonresident Board of Directors was well positioned since it had been meeting virtually since 2016. Already comfortable with remote governance, we seamlessly transitioned to what became the global new normal.

To ensure we were aligned and had a unified perspective on AIIB's response to COVID-19, the Board of Directors and Management met and deliberated more frequently. Open communication and deliberation enabled us to decide on an approach that allowed AIIB to expand into new markets and employ new financing modalities to meet clients’ needs.

We supported the decision to launch the Crisis Recovery Facility to fund the public and private sectors and help them navigate the economic and health impacts of COVID-19. The Board timely considered and approved the facility’s projects. The move represented a temporary shift in investment strategy from our core work because it was imperative for the Bank to lend in a countercyclical environment. Once the financial and health impacts of COVID-19 are behind us, we expect AIIB to return to its mission of investing in Infrastructure for Tomorrow and to unlock new capital, new technologies and new ways to mitigate climate change and to connect Asia and the world.

The Corporate Strategy’s mission and strategic direction is the result of deep Board of Directors engagement and consultations beginning in 2019 and unanimous approval of the strategy in September 2020. Ambitious yet concise, the strategy reflects the will of diverse shareholders from all over the world to come together to shape the future we want to inhabit. AIIB’s vision is a prosperous Asia based on sustainable economic development, regional cooperation and partnerships. We take pride in the process of deliberation, debate and reconciliation that came with this important, strategic decision.

Under the Corporate Strategy, we committed to targets on climate finance, cross-border connectivity and private sector financing because we are committed to an economically resilient future. We aim to reach or surpass by 2025 a 50-percent share of climate finance in our financing approvals, and reach by 2030 a 50-percent share of private sector financing in our actual approved financing and a 25- to 30-percent share for cross-border connectivity projects in our financing approvals.

With sustainability at its core, AIIB’s investments across infrastructure and other productive sectors seek to add value through the crosscutting themes of green infrastructure, connectivity and private capital mobilization. The introduction of technology-enabled infrastructure as a thematic priority area for AIIB is a testament to the times. If Asia is to succeed in the fourth industrial revolution, its infrastructure must be built smarter and its people must be connected to the digital economy.

If Asia is to be prosperous, it must mobilize private and public capital to finance Infrastructure for Tomorrow. Asia must invest in green infrastructure that helps members adapt to and mitigate the impact of climate change and protects or improves the local environment. Asia must build better connections within the region and with the rest of the world. Asia’s infrastructure should make use of the best available water, transport, energy and urban technologies and information and communication technology innovation to deliver better quality, higher efficiency and greater sustainability. This is the Infrastructure for Tomorrow we envision under our Corporate Strategy. It is the Bank’s overarching long-term strategy, supported by strategies in our core investment areas. In 2020, we approved water and digital infrastructure strategies to complement strategies for energy, transport, sustainable cities, equity and private capital mobilization.

Now into AIIB’s sixth year, we look back at what has been achieved in a short time. Even though 2020 was an extraordinary year in so many ways, it did not hamper AIIB’s development or ability to serve its members. The additionality of AIIB and its role in the international development community are maturing. The partnerships created speak to the high caliber of AIIB’s work.

We should take a moment to acknowledge how much the Bank has achieved. Its governance framework and major policies and strategies are in place and functioning well. The relationship between the Board of Directors and Management is strong and collaborative. A talented and diverse staff is coalescing around a new mission and strategy that will take AIIB forward into the next 10 years. Innovations are being explored and funds are flowing to build sustainable infrastructure that will impact billions of people in Asia and beyond.

With this milestone now behind us, we look to the future: to a vision of a prosperous Asia built on sustainable economic development.


AIIB Board of Directors

2020 Timeline

Jan. 7

We begin the year by encouraging each other to spark and share ideas. On our inaugural Inspire Day, we discuss ways to improve our work and workplace.

We begin the year by encouraging each other
ENLARGE
Feb. 21

Ghana becomes a full member upon fulfilling the terms and conditions set out in the Board of Governors Resolution No. 70.

Feb. 24

We begin work on what would later be known as the COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility in response to the pandemic that suddenly changed our world. We donate USD1 million to help China control COVID-19, comprising donations from AIIB staff and matching funds from the Bank.

We begin work on what would later be known as the COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility
ENLARGE
Feb. 26

Cote d’Ivoire becomes a full member upon fulfilling the terms and conditions set out in the Board of Governors Resolution No. 76.

March 16

The pandemic weighs upon the world and we respond promptly to serve our clients. As Beijing begins returning to normal, our headquarters re-opened to staff who had been working remotely.

The pandemic weighs upon the world
ENLARGE
April 3

We stand by our members and clients. In response to urgent economic, financial and public health pressures, we launch the COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility, starting with USD5 billion in funds, eventually reaching USD13 billion because of high client demand.

April 16

Rwanda becomes a full member upon fulfilling the terms and conditions set out in the Board of Governors Resolution No. 82.

April 28

Uruguay becomes a full member upon fulfilling the terms and conditions set out in the Board of Governors Resolution No. 79.

May 7

Committed to helping our members ensure that water and sanitation are available for all and that they are managed sustainably, we approve our Water Sector Strategy.

May 7

We establish the Special Fund Window under the COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility to provide interest rate buy-down for sovereign-backed financing for our members that are eligible only for International Development Association support.

May 25

Benin becomes a full member upon fulfilling the terms and conditions set out in the Board of Governors Resolution No. 80.

June 1

We move into our permanent home at the Beijing Olympic Park. Our headquarters receives the highest green building evaluation rating in China and the highest honor for green buildings worldwide (LEED Platinum).

We move into our permanent home at the Beijing Olympic Park
ENLARGE
June 1

Cook Islands becomes a full member upon fulfilling the terms and conditions set out in the Board of Governors Resolution No. 51.

June 11

We price our RMB3-billion inaugural Panda Bond, which carries the “Combating COVID-19” label.

We price our RMB3-billion inaugural
ENLARGE
June 17

We are awarded EDGE accreditation, the leading global assessment and certification for gender equality. EDGE is committed to giving equal opportunities to everyone in the workplace.

June 22

Aiming to develop digital infrastructure to bridge the digital divide, we approve the Digital Infrastructure Sector Strategy.

June

We hold regular elections for the Board of Directors virtually in June 2020, one month before the incumbent Directors’ term expires. Nine regional and three nonregional directors are elected, to serve a regular two-year term, from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2022.

July 28

We hold our fifth Annual Meeting in Beijing, our first virtual annual meeting.

Fifth Annual Meeting
ENLARGE
July 28

Our President, Jin Liqun, is reelected to a second five-year term beginning Jan. 16, 2021.

Fifth Annual Meeting
ENLARGE
July 28

As our Board of Governors approves Liberia’s membership application, our total approved membership reaches 103 (including both members and prospective members).*

Aug. 13

We make our first investment in the Pacific with USD50 million in assistance to help Fiji cope with the impact of COVID-19. The project will support government efforts to assist small and medium-sized enterprises and their employees and women microentrepreneurs.

Sep. 9

Together with Amundi, we launch the AIIB-Amundi Climate Change Investment Framework, the first investment benchmark tool that allows investors to measure issuer performance against the objectives of the Paris Agreement.

Sep. 24

Our Corporate Strategy is approved. With Financing Infrastructure for Tomorrow as our mission, we set targets for 2025 and 2030.

Sep. 24

We approve our first satellite-based infrastructure project with a USD150-million loan to provide broadband internet to more than 149,400 unserved areas in Indonesia (including schools, hospitals and local government locations).

Fifth Annual Meeting
ENLARGE
Oct. 8

We join Global Careers for Women 2020 to proactively close the workplace gender gap through online recruitment.

Oct. 16

We approve our 100th project, to improve access to safely managed water supply and sanitation in selected areas of rural Bangladesh and to strengthen institutional capacity for water and sanitation.

Fifth Annual Meeting
ENLARGE
Nov. 2

Founding member Brazil fulfills all requirements for membership.

Nov. 25

We make our first investment in Latin America, a USD50-million loan to Ecuador’s largest public bank to ease liquidity constraints facing micro, small and medium-sized enterprises caused by the economic crisis induced by COVID-19.

Nov. 25

We approve USD100 million investment in the ADM Capital Elkhorn Emerging Asia Renewable Energy Fund. It is a first-of-its-kind private debt fund dedicated to providing credit solutions to small and medium-sized enterprises and projects in the renewable energy and energy-efficiency sector in emerging Asia.

Dec. 3

We hold our annual legal conference virtually on Funding International Development Organizations: Innovations of Law and Practice. It focuses on how the law and practice governing funding mobilization are of central importance to the sustainability of international development organizations, which depend on a multitude of funding sources and instruments.

Dec. 7

We adopt the latest greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting methodologies used by the joint international financial institution working group, furthering our technical support to teams quantifying GHG emissions in AIIB energy projects.

Dec. 11

We hold the 2020 AIIB Law Lecture, The Judicial Role of the International Court of Justice in the Development of International Law.

Fifth Annual Meeting
ENLARGE
Dec. 31

Throughout 2020, we stand by our clients during the pandemic through our COVID-19 Crisis Recovery Facility, funds from which are allocated to 71 percent of our investments approved in 2020 (USD7.07 billion out of USD9.98 billion total investments in 2020) or 27 Facility projects in 19 members (out of a total of 45 projects approved in 2020).

Dec. 31

In less than five years, we cross the USD22-billion investment mark, approve 108 projects. The total number of AIIB members (83) and prospective members (20) reaches 103. By the end of 2020, we have invested in 28 of our members.

*Prospective members are those that either have signed the AIIB Articles of Agreement (AoA) (Signatories listed in Schedule A to the AoA), pending ratification, or whose membership applications have been approved by the Board of Governors, pending their ratification of the AoA and/or required payment for their subscribed capital stock of the Bank. Once the aforementioned requirements are fulfilled, a prospective member becomes a member of the Bank.